Archaia Forum

The Archaia Forum (formerly the Yale Interdisciplinary Working Group for the Study of Antiquity - YIWSA) invites all graduate students and post-docs who research any dimension of the ancient or premodern world (including its modern reception) to apply to share their work with colleagues from a variety of disciplines invested in the study of antiquity and premodernity.

Presenters can propose 20 minute papers to be paired with another short talk or response by a colleague from a different department; we also welcome longer presentations with focus on broader methodological issues. Works in progress, preliminary explorations, and teach-ins are welcome as well as polished work and old topics worth revisiting, so long as the presenter is committed to communicating his or her idea in a way accessible to those outside his or her field and open to questions, comments, and comparative discussion. Presentations that focus on methodological considerations in the interdisciplinary study of antiquity and premodernity are especially encouraged.  We encourage cross-disciplinary conversation above all. Presenters may even prefer to focus on case-studies in order to flesh out broader methodological questions or insights.  

The goal of the working group is to promote dialogue across disciplinary boundaries (of Classics, History, Religious Studies, Medieval Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, East Asian Languages and Literatures, History of Art, South Asian Studies, etc.) among all of us who share the distant past as our object of study. Meetings will generally be held monthly on Thursdays at 5:30 pm.

Those interested in presenting during the academic year 2017–2018 should contact Emily Hurt (emily.hurt@yale.edu) with preliminary proposals or any questions. We request proposals by September 15 at the latest.

Organizers: Nina Farizova (EALL, nina.farizova@yale.edu), Mark Lester (RLST, mark.lester@yale.edu), Emily Hurt (History, emily.hurt@yale.edu) and Kyle Conrau-Lewis (Classics, kyle.conrau-lewis@yale.edu).
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